Deeks Creek

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Deeks Creek Canyoneering Canyoning Caving
Deeks Creek

Deeks Creek Banner.jpg

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Best season:
Jul-Sep [REGION]
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Conditions:
Weather
2 Jul 2015



TripReport

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Location:
Region:
Metric
Rating:
3C II (v3a4 II)
Time:
3h-5h overall
Hike: 820ft approach
Descent: 0.7mi817ft
Raps: 6-8, Max82ft
Vehicle: Passenger
Shuttle:
Permits:


Introduction

Deeks Creek is an easy half day canyon with easy access from the Sea to Sky Highway. It is similar in difficulty as nearby Cypress Creek. The Canyon has four to eight easy rappels and a lot of technical downclimbing in water and on logs, but none of it difficult.

This is a good first-timers canyon.

Approach

Best Parking is just on the south side of Loggers Creek Bridge, which is about 500 meters south of where Deeks Creek crosses Highway 99. There is no parking at the Deeks Creek bridge.

Access is from the popular Deeks Bluff trail. Do not confuse with the Deeks Lake hike which begins about 800 meters further north from the proper parking lot.

The shortest version of the route (about 4 Rappels and 4h) is hiking up to about 250 meters of altitude. From there the trail should be evenly sloping down towards the creek. The gear up location is near this old but still in use water capture dam. Do not disturb as this is a micro-electric generator feed pipe. You will see the outflow near the end, under a residential home.

  • Water capture dam
  • A longer more interesting route (about 6 rappels and 5h) is to continue up the trail and drop in at around 300 meters of altitude and drop in right before a scenic jump/slide area. This route will include the best part of the canyon.

    An even longer route (not recommended) is to continue up an drop in at around 350 meters, this will add 2 more short rappels to the route.

    Descent

    Depending on how high you hike up and where you start the canyon, there are four to eight rappels, each under 25 Meters. Two are all bolted, the rest have plenty of trees or natural horns to rappel from.

    In moderate and low conditions it is a lot of fun to rappel directly in the waterfalls. But if you face high water conditions or not comfortable, you can run any of the rappels completely out of the water.

    • R-4 : 10m rappel from logs, easily bypassable
    • R-3 : 10m rappel from logs, easily bypassable

    <<jump/slide area than can also be bypassed>>

    • R-2 : 15m rappel from a tiny tree DCR rappeling directly in the waterflow or from a tree DCL to stay out
    • R-1 : 15m from traversed log rappeling down into the gap between twin streams flowing around a chokestone

    <<water capture dam>>

    • R1 : Anchor on Left hand side of Canyon at head height. 25 meters. Check out the massive Cave on Climbers LEft.
    • R2 : Anchor on large flat rock. 20 Meters. Picture misleading, as rope will come down Rock and then into a small notch. Rappel is mostly free hanging.
    • R3 : We used a big rock back of the edge to loop rope over. 15 Meters. Pool is shallow, do not jump.
    • R4: We used some trees on Rappellers Right into a notch. 12 Meters. Plenty of other options.

    Creek above described route was explored to Deeks Lake with no Canyon or noteworthy obstacles.

    Exit

    After Rappel #4 you can walk to the highway Exit. Past the highway is more Canyon but Zero chance of escape or hiking out.

    Red tape

    Beta sites

    Trip reports and media

    Background

    First Descent by Amber Brown, Chris Arnold, Kevin Mueller, Philippe Lapointe on September 1st 2014. Information and pictures on this canyon provided by Philippe Lapointe.

    Credits

    Information provided by automated processes. KML map by (unknown). Main photo by (unknown). Authors are listed in chronological order.

    In all habitats live animals and plants that deserve respect, please minimize impact on the environment and observe the local ethics. Canyoneering, Canyoning, Caving and other activities described in this site are inherently dangerous. Reliance on the information contained on this site is solely at your own risk. There is no warranty as to accuracy, timeliness or completeness of the information provided on this site. The site administrators and all the contributing authors expressly disclaim any and all liability for any loss or injury caused, in whole or in part, by its actions, omissions, or negligence in procuring, compiling or providing information through this site, including without limitation, liability with respect to any use of the information contained herein. If you notice any omission or mistakes, please contribute your knowledge (more information).