Monmouth Canyon

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Monmouth Canyon Canyoneering Canyoning Caving
Monmouth Canyon

Monmouth Canyon Banner.jpg

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Best season:
Jun-Oct
winterspringsummerfall
DecJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNov
Conditions:
Weather
6 Jul 2015



TripReport

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Location:
Region:
Metric
Rating:
3C III (v3a4 III)
Time:
8h-10h overall
Hike: 3.4mi
Descent: 0.5mi1309ft
Raps: 11-14, Max150ft
Vehicle: Passenger
Shuttle:
Watercraft: Yes
Permits:


Introduction

Meet Monmouth Canyon, the more flamboyent sister adjacent to Box Canyon. While Box Canyon features narrow slots lined with polished granite walls, Monmouth showcases big 200ft multi-tier drops with infiniti pools that look out to the towering granite cliffs that surround the city of Squamish. But even before the spectacular views show up, there's a 20 ft nearly vertical slide into a narrow passage that defies the voice in your head telling you that it looks...looks like it ought to be a rappel instead. Assuming you've check the water levels are safe, slide! and let the fun begin.

Even during late Summer, the water is still cold as the source is glacier melt so bring a thick wetsuit (or appropriate layers of neoprene).

Approach

Getting to Monmouth canyon requires crossing the Squamish river. For small groups, consider renting a canoe at the Squamish Adventure Center. It will fit 3 people including gear. Canoes must be returned at the end of the day so be sure to know when the Adventure Center closes. Depending on the season and time of day, the mosquitos are particularly vicious near the river banks. Some may dawn on a wetsuit to prevent mosquito bites but it is advisable to change into your wetsuit at the drop-in point. The hike in is steep but on a well-maintained trail.

When you get in the proximity of the canyon, after crossing the powerlines, make sure you take the trail that goes Left. The Right branch takes to a promotory with a nice view but then dies out.

Descent

The descent is described in great detail in the Beta Sites listed below.

  • Top down view of the famous Keyhole rappel (Photo by Duffy Knox)
  • Exit

    There are several options to exit after the famous Keyhole rappel in case members of the group or cold, tired, or nightfall is approaching. After the Keyhole rappel, there are 3-4 more rappels before reaching the creek bottom. It can be done within 1.5 hrs with an experienced team.

    If you are renting a canoe from the Squamish Adventure Center, be aware of when you need to return the canoe. If possible, arrange for returning the canoe after hours.

    Red tape

    Beta sites

    Trip reports and media

    Background

    Credits

    Information provided by automated processes. KML map by (unknown). Main photo by (unknown). Authors are listed in chronological order.

    In all habitats live animals and plants that deserve respect, please minimize impact on the environment and observe the local ethics. Canyoneering, Canyoning, Caving and other activities described in this site are inherently dangerous. Reliance on the information contained on this site is solely at your own risk. There is no warranty as to accuracy, timeliness or completeness of the information provided on this site. The site administrators and all the contributing authors expressly disclaim any and all liability for any loss or injury caused, in whole or in part, by its actions, omissions, or negligence in procuring, compiling or providing information through this site, including without limitation, liability with respect to any use of the information contained herein. If you notice any omission or mistakes, please contribute your knowledge (more information).

    Incidents

    IncidentCanyoneering?SeverityDate
    Struck underwater rock while on rappel in Monmouth Creek, British ColumbiatrueInjury2016-08-20